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Who is the

consumer behind

the mask?

Any brand communication strategy requires a deep understanding of the driving forces behind consumer behaviour and the characteristics that influence buying decisions. As communicators, we have the option of choosing one or several segmentation tools to derive key consumer insights to help inform brand communication strategies. However, the coronavirus outbreak not only accelerated digital adoption and made e-commerce a non-negotiable for brands, but has also shaped consumers’ outlook on life and what they value the most.

While Living Standards Measure (LSM) has long been the go-to tool for consumer segmentation, additional tools such as Socio-Economic Segmentation (SEM) and classifications such as Gen X, Gen Z and Millennials have provided us with additional insights.

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The rise of Post-Pandemic Tribes

As the world faces one of the biggest pandemics of its time, we have been introduced to Post-Pandemic Tribes – a recent categorisation created by trends strategist company, Flux Trends.

To describe specific consumer communities, the company first introduced its concept of Tribes in 2012, focusing on New Urban Tribes, and in 2017, Consciously Diverse Tribes. In 2021, this became Post Pandemic Tribes – communities that emerged as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. Although there are numerous sub-categories within Post-Pandemic Tribes, we focus on three broad consumer categories identified by Flux Trends and their related insights:

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Digital Hustler Extraordinaires

Digital Hustler Extraordinaires (16 – 34) is a general classification of young people incorporating different youth segments. Many in this category have been forced to move back in with their parents. This includes tertiary students and first time workers, who cannot afford to live on their own due to job losses, salary cuts and limited opportunities to re-enter the workforce. They do, however, have an entrepreneurial spirit which they link back to their talents. They use social media to communicate their business ventures and have become the driving force for social media influencer campaigns that give brands great reach and third party endorsement on platforms.

The opportunity remains for brands to reach the 16-34 age segment with compelling and authentic digital content that they resonate with. Statista estimates that South Africa has approximately 23.77 million active social media users, with another Statista report highlighting that the 16-24 and 25-34 age segments constitute just under 14 million active social media users. There are opportunities to collaborate with influencers to co-create visually appealing digital content that represents the usage behaviour of the influencer and in turn, makes it relatable to their followers. This is a great way to build brand awareness and relevant content from a source trusted by consumers.

Tree Huggers

The pandemic forced Tree Huggers (35 – 54) – or Generation X with a spillover into the Millennial demographic – to become life auditors and re-evaluate what is important in their lives. This includes the need to create stronger bonds with family and let go of relationships that no longer add value. Working from home has enabled them to start families, adopt pets or even relocate to more secluded cities. Statistics South Africa suggests that the highest COVID-19 cases are recorded between South Africans between the ages of 35 and 55, and have lost families and friends to the pandemic. This makes them empathetic with the current plight facing the world.

Brands can develop purpose-led brand communication strategies that pull on their heartstrings and allow for activism on socio-economic issues. They are no strangers to technology and use social media to voice opinions on issues of national interest. Although they consume digital content on various platforms, traditional media plays a major role in their media consumption with a heavy reliance on radio and TV. Purpose-led communication strategies should always be supported by action, and corporate social investment (CSI) programmes are a great way to publicise how a brand is part of the solution driving humanity forward.

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FOGOs

The FOGO (Fear Of Going Out) consumer segment, incorporating people over 55, is the most vulnerable segment to COVID-19 according to Statistics South Africa. Lockdown restrictions made it easy for them to embrace solitude and they have isolated themselves to safeguard their health. They have been forced to adopt digital tools to facilitate working from home.

Broadcast is an integral part of their daily media consumption, but FOGOs also rely on multiple media channels to consume brand content. An integrated communication strategy is a viable option for communicators to reach FOGOs and execution should be supported by simplified and easily understood messaging. This can include infographics; advert placement across broadcast channels; brand messaging on corporate websites; strong voices from influential leaders; and a solid public relations plan including media releases, roundtables and broadcast interviews.

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Bespoke solutions

So, who is the consumer behind the mask? Irrespective of their demographics, many have embraced the digital age because their source of income relies on it. It is a means of connecting with people who matter the most and brands that harness the power of CSI programmes as a means to rebuild society will always win in the eyes of consumers. This is because they connect with socio-economic issues that have a positive impact on humanity, and traditional media channels should always be considered in the integrated communications strategy. While media placement on broadcast channels is expensive – a great public relations plan allows brands to leverage their brand story to the consumer in an engaging and authentic manner, fostering two-way communication across traditional and digital channels.

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who is the

consumer behind

the mask?

Any brand communication strategy requires a deep understanding of the driving forces behind consumer behaviour and the characteristics that influence buying decisions. As communicators, we have the option of choosing one or several segmentation tools to derive key consumer insights to help inform brand communication strategies. However, the coronavirus outbreak not only accelerated digital adoption and made e-commerce a non-negotiable for brands, but has also shaped consumers’ outlook on life and what they value the most.

While Living Standards Measure (LSM) has long been the go-to tool for consumer segmentation, additional tools such as Socio-Economic Segmentation (SEM) and classifications such as Gen X, Gen Z and Millennials have provided us with additional insights.

The rise of Post-Pandemic Tribes

As the world faces one of the biggest pandemics of its time, we have been introduced to Post-Pandemic Tribes – a recent categorisation created by trends strategist company, Flux Trends.

To describe specific consumer communities, the company first introduced its concept of Tribes in 2012, focusing on New Urban Tribes, and in 2017, Consciously Diverse Tribes. In 2021, this became Post Pandemic Tribes – communities that emerged as a result of the coronavirus outbreak. Although there are numerous sub-categories within Post-Pandemic Tribes, we focus on three broad consumer categories identified by Flux Trends and their related insights:

Digital Hustler Extraordinaires

Digital Hustler Extraordinaires (16 – 34) is a general classification of young people incorporating different youth segments. Many in this category have been forced to move back in with their parents. This includes tertiary students and first time workers, who cannot afford to live on their own due to job losses, salary cuts and limited opportunities to re-enter the workforce. They do, however, have an entrepreneurial spirit which they link back to their talents. They use social media to communicate their business ventures and have become the driving force for social media influencer campaigns that give brands great reach and third party endorsement on platforms.

The opportunity remains for brands to reach the 16-34 age segment with compelling and authentic digital content that they resonate with. Statista estimates that South Africa has approximately 23.77 million active social media users, with another Statista report highlighting that the 16-24 and 25-34 age segments constitute just under 14 million active social media users. There are opportunities to collaborate with influencers to co-create visually appealing digital content that represents the usage behaviour of the influencer and in turn, makes it relatable to their followers. This is a great way to build brand awareness and relevant content from a source trusted by consumers.

Tree Huggers

The pandemic forced Tree Huggers (35 – 54) – or Generation X with a spillover into the Millennial demographic – to become life auditors and re-evaluate what is important in their lives. This includes the need to create stronger bonds with family and let go of relationships that no longer add value. Working from home has enabled them to start families, adopt pets or even relocate to more secluded cities. Statistics South Africa suggests that the highest COVID-19 cases are recorded between South Africans between the ages of 35 and 55, and have lost families and friends to the pandemic. This makes them empathetic with the current plight facing the world.

Brands can develop purpose-led brand communication strategies that pull on their heartstrings and allow for activism on socio-economic issues. They are no strangers to technology and use social media to voice opinions on issues of national interest. Although they consume digital content on various platforms, traditional media plays a major role in their media consumption with a heavy reliance on radio and TV. Purpose-led communication strategies should always be supported by action, and corporate social investment (CSI) programmes are a great way to publicise how a brand is part of the solution driving humanity forward.

footer img copy 3

FOGOs

The FOGO (Fear Of Going Out) consumer segment, incorporating people over 55, is the most vulnerable segment to COVID-19 according to Statistics South Africa. Lockdown restrictions made it easy for them to embrace solitude and they have isolated themselves to safeguard their health. They have been forced to adopt digital tools to facilitate working from home.

Broadcast is an integral part of their daily media consumption, but FOGOs also rely on multiple media channels to consume brand content. An integrated communication strategy is a viable option for communicators to reach FOGOs and execution should be supported by simplified and easily understood messaging. This can include infographics; advert placement across broadcast channels; brand messaging on corporate websites; strong voices from influential leaders; and a solid public relations plan including media releases, roundtables and broadcast interviews.

Bespoke Solutions

So, who is the consumer behind the mask? Irrespective of their demographics, many have embraced the digital age because their source of income relies on it. It is a means of connecting with people who matter the most and brands that harness the power of CSI programmes as a means to rebuild society will always win in the eyes of consumers. This is because they connect with socio-economic issues that have a positive impact on humanity, and traditional media channels should always be considered in the integrated communications strategy. While media placement on broadcast channels is expensive – a great public relations plan allows brands to leverage their brand story to the consumer in an engaging and authentic manner, fostering two-way communication across traditional and digital channels.

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Need to figure out how to reach your brand’s tribes more effectively? Send an email to info@eclipsecomms.com and one of our experts will be in touch.

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